Fourth Amendment

“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” 

- U.S. Const. amend. IV. 

NACDL seeks to ensure that the Fourth Amendment remains a vibrant protection against encroachments on the privacy of the individual through litigation and public advocacy. The Fourth Amendment is the appropriate starting point for assessing the limits on government intrusion into one’s privacy, and its protections must continue to thrive in the digital age. The Fourth Amendment and its guarantees should not turn on the medium used to transmit private information, nor on how the information is stored. NACDL strives to guarantee that evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment is excluded in a court of law.

Symposium: The Fourth Amendment in the Digital Age

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On Friday, April 3, 2015 in Washington, DC, NACDL, the Foundation for Criminal Justice, the American University Washington College of Law, and the Criminal Law Practitioner present a one-day symposium on "The Fourth Amendment in the Digital Age.'' Scholars, policy experts, and practitioners will convene for an open discussion about how digital searches, government surveillance programs and new technologies are impacting Fourth Amendment protections in criminal cases. The event will also be recorded and live-streamed. Registration (required) and detailed information available here. The program details are available here and speaker bios are available here.

NEW! NACDL REPORT: What's Old Is New Again: Retaining Fourth Amendment Protections in Warranted Digital Searches (Pre-Search Instructions and Post-Search Reasonableness) 

Highlights

News Of Interest

"U.S. Supreme Court: GPS Trackers Are a Form of Search and Seizure," by Robinson Meyer, The Atlantic, March 30, 2015.

"NSA thought of dropping program to collect phone data, officials say," by Ken Dilanian, The Washington Post, March 29, 2015.

"Anonymous Tip, Drugs in Car Aren’t Enough for Home Search, Panel Says," by Katheryn Hayes Tucker, The Daily Report, March 25, 2015.

"Senate Panel Concerned Over CIA Role in Domestic Cellphone Scanning," by Devlin Barrett, The Wall Street Journal, March 23, 2015.

"Sacramento Democrat wants DNA collection for drug misdemeanors, shoplifting," Southern California Public Radio, March 23, 2015.

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