June 2003

June 2003

 

Articles in this Issue

  1. A Gideon Moment

    A Gideon Moment David Tarrell

  2. Affiliate News

    Affiliate News Gerald Lippert

  3. Change, redemption do exist

    Change, redemption do exist David Bruck

  4. Computer forensics: how to obtain and analyze electronic evidence

    Computer forensics: how to obtain and analyze electronic evidence Wade Davies

  5. Faulty forensic evidence

    Faulty forensic evidence Michele Nethercott

  6. Friend of the Court

    Can a defendant in a criminal case challenge a statute or ordinance on the basis that it is overbroad where his offense did not involve any expressive conduct and his conduct was not proscribed by the statute or ordinance? Lisa Kemler

  7. Lawyers: Do they have First Amendment rights?

    Lawyers: Do they have First Amendment rights? Barry Tarlow

  8. NACDL News

    Congressmen, actors join stars of defense bar to make New York spring meeting a success Daniel Dodson

  9. NACDL’s fight to save judicial discretion

    NACDL’s fight to save judicial discretion Ralph Grunewald

  10. Reviews in Review: Consciousness; Wrongfully convicted

    Consciousness; Wrongfully convicted Ellen S. Podgor

  11. Section 1348: What is 'in connection with’ the sale of securities?

    Section 1348: What is in connection with’ the sale of securities? Kathryn Keneally

  12. The Feeney Amendment

    The Feeney Amendment Lawrence Goldman

  13. The Irony of Apprendi

    The Irony of Apprendi Mark Allenbaugh

  14. The psychometrics and science of the standardized field sobriety tests (Part 2)

    The psychometrics and science of the standardized field sobriety tests (Part 2) Steve Rubenzer

  15. Using Polygraph Evidence After Scheffer (Part 2)

    Using Polygraph Evidence After Scheffer (Part 2) Charles Daniels

  16. When the Government Seizes and Searches Your Client’s Computer

    When the Government Seizes and Searches Your Client’s Computer Amy Baron-Evans

  17. Who’s Afraid of the Federal Judiciary? Why Congress’ fear of judicial sentencing discretion may unde

    Who’s Afraid of the Federal Judiciary? Why Congress’ fear of judicial sentencing discretion may undermine a generation of reform Mark H. Allenbaugh