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The Champion

November 2017 , Page 55 

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Getting Scholarship Into Court Project

By Getting Scholarship Into Court Project

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Cara H. Drinan
The
Miller Revolution
101 Iowa L. Rev. 1787 (2016)
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2475126 

In a series of cases culminating in Miller v. Alabama, the U.S. Supreme Court has limited the extent to which juveniles may be exposed to the harshest criminal sentences. While scholars have addressed discrete components of these recent decisions, Professor Cara Drinan draws upon that scholarship to make a broader claim: the Miller trilogy has revolutionized juvenile justice. After briefly canvassing the history of American juvenile sentencing, Professor Drinan examines Miller, as well as its immediate predecessor cases, and explains why Miller demands a capacious reading. The heart of the article explores the post-Miller revolution in juvenile justice. Specifically relevant for practitioners and courts, Professor Drinan makes the case for two immediate groundbreaking corollaries that flow from Miller: (1) the creation of procedural safeguards for juveniles facing life without

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