Fourth Amendment

“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” 

- U.S. Const. amend. IV. 

NACDL seeks to ensure that the Fourth Amendment remains a vibrant protection against encroachments on the privacy of the individual through litigation and public advocacy. The Fourth Amendment is the appropriate starting point for assessing the limits on government intrusion into one’s privacy, and its protections must continue to thrive in the digital age. The Fourth Amendment and its guarantees should not turn on the medium used to transmit private information, nor on how the information is stored. NACDL strives to guarantee that evidence obtained in violation of the Fourth Amendment is excluded in a court of law.

NEW! NACDL REPORT: Mail Cover Surveillance: Problems and Recommendations 

Symposium: The Fourth Amendment in the Digital Age

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On Friday, April 3, 2015 in Washington, DC, NACDL, the Foundation for Criminal Justice, the American University Washington College of Law, and the Criminal Law Practitioner presented a one-day symposium on "The Fourth Amendment in the Digital Age.'' Scholars, policy experts, and practitioners will convene for an open discussion about how digital searches, government surveillance programs and new technologies are impacting Fourth Amendment protections in criminal cases. The event was recorded and live-streamed. The program details are available here and speaker bios are available here.

Highlights

News Of Interest

"The U.S.'s Century-Old Snail Mail Surveillance Sparks A New Privacy Argument," by Steven Melendez, Fast Company, April 22, 2015.

"Report Seeks Overhaul of Postal Service Surveillance Program," by Ron Nixon, The New York Times, April 21, 2015.

"Opinion analysis: Traffic stops can’t last too long or go too far, and no extra dog sniffs!," by Rory Little, SCOTUSblog, April 21, 2015.

"Court Splits on Passengers' Rights During Traffic Stops," by Michael Booth, New Jersey Law Journal, April 21, 2015.

"Nevada Judge: FBI Ruse Violated Fourth Amendment," The National Law Journal, April 17, 2015.

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