Immigration

Padilla in Practice series

three free webinars providing IMMIGRATION LAW ESSENTIALS for defense lawyers: 

Overview of Concepts & Discussion of Emerging Issues     materials    webcast 
Immigration Consequences of Drug Offenses     materials handout webcast       
Immigration Consequences of Domestic Violence & Related Cases  materials      webcast 

    Learn more about our Resource Center Training Series 

Suggested Reading

Post Padilla: Padilla’s Puzzles for Review in State and Federal Courts - Nancy J. King and Gray Proctor, Federal Sentencing Reporter, Vol. 23, No. 3, February 2011.

Immigration Consequences of Criminal Convictions: Padilla v. Kentucky - Office of Immigration Litigation, U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Division (Sept. 2010) This document is intended to assist federal and state prosecutors, judges and other interested parties in understanding the immigration consequences of a non-citizen’s guilty plea in a criminal case.

“Duty of Criminal Defense Counsel Representing an Immigrant Defendant After Padilla v. Kentucky” - Immigrant Defense Project  

Padilla Sample Intake Form from Washington Defender Association’s Immigration Project www.defensenet.orgwww.defensenet.org/immigration-project 

Cultural Issues in Criminal Defense - (Linda Friedman Ramirez, editor; 3rd Ed., Aug. 2010) available for order at Juris Publishing 

Immigration Law and Crimes (2009) - by Dan Kesselbrenner and Lory Rosenberg, available for order from Thompson West here 

Immigration Law and Defense (3rd ed., 2010) - by the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild, available for order from Thompson West here.

Immigration Consequences of Criminal Activity (4th ed., 2009) - by Mary E. Kramer, available for order from AILA Publications here.

Web Links

ABA Padilla Resource Page - The American Bar Association Criminal Justice Section Padilla Task Force presents Padilla and Beyond, the Criminal Justice Section Symposium Materials. Materials include articles, reference tools and two videos for judicial, prosecutorial, and defense agencies as well as for the general public.

Online Detainee Locator System - On the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement website www.ice.gov ODLS as a tool for family member, lawyers, and others interested parties to locate individuals who are detained in ICE custody. ODLS provides information on the location of the detention facility where an individual is being held, facility phone number, and contact information for the ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations office in that region.

Immigrant Defense Project - Defends the legal, constitutional and human rights of immigrants facing criminal or deportation charges. A wealth of helpful immigration materials for defense lawyers can be found on this website.

Immigrant Legal Resource Center - A non-profit resource center that advocates on behalf of immigrants and provides educational materials and legal training to assist defense counsel. A wealth of helpful immigration materials for defense lawyers can be found on this website.

Defending Immigrants Partnership - Developed by the Immigrant Legal Resource Center, Immigrant Defense Project, National Legal Aid and Defender Association and the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild to assist criminal defenders in representing noncitizens. Has many resources that will be of use to defense counsel.

National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild, Inc. - A national membership organization providing legal assistance and technical support to immigrant communities, legal practitioners, and advocates. Has many resources that will be of use to defense counsel.

Extradition and Cross Border Criminal Defense - News Linda Friedman Ramirez's blog at http://obtainingforeignevidence.blogspot.com 

American Immigration Lawyers Association 

Washington Defender Association’s Immigration Project  

Southern Poverty Law Center - A non-profit civil rights organization whose priorities include immigrant justice.

Champion Articles

Padilla v. Kentucky: The Right to Counsel and the Collateral Consequences of Conviction - Margaret Colgate Love and Gabriel J. Chin (May 2010)

Committee Briefing: Attorney Must Tell Client Whether Plea Carries Immigration Consequences - Tova Indritz (April 2010)

Evolving Extradition - Linda Friedman Ramirez (2009)

Immigration - Ivan Dominguez (2009)

Informal Opinion (Six Informal Immigration-Related Criminal Justice Ideas for the New Administration and Congress) - Tova Indritz (2009)

Representing a Non-Citizen in a Criminal Case - Scott E. Bratton (2007)

When the Accused Faces Loss of Family and Property, as well as Liberty - Miriam Gohara (2003)

Preventative Lawyering: How Defense Counsel Can Defend Immigrants' Rights - Laury Diana Rosenberg of the National Legal Aid and Defender Association (2003)

Cultural Factors in Motions to Suppress - James G. Connell III and Rene L. Valladares (2001) 

Additional Reading

Defense Counsel's Duty to Advise of Immigration Consequences under Padilla v. Kentucky - Defense lawyers must correctly advise their clients about the immigration consequences of entering a plea, the U. S. Supreme Court recently held in Padilla v. Kentucky (No. 08-651, March 31, 2010). The Immigrant Defense Project has developed this practice advisory to inform defense lawyers of their duty under Padilla and help them better understand their obligations to noncitizen clients: “Duty of Criminal Defense Counsel Representing an Immigrant Defendant After Padilla v. Kentucky.” 

READ MORE  

PADILLA IN PRACTICE: Your Duty to Advise Clients of Immigration Consequences 

Carachuri-Rosendo v. Holder, (No. 09-60, June 14, 2010) - A second minor drug possession offense does not constitute automatic grounds for deportation of a lawful legal resident, the U.S. Supreme Court decided in Carachuri-Rosendo v. Holder. The Court held that when a defendant has been convicted of a simple possession offense that has not been enhanced by a prior conviction, he has not been convicted of an immigration “aggravated felony” punishable under the Controlled Substances Act rendering him automatically deportable (as opposed to removable) under federal law.

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